Competition from citizen journalists (or why I’m shooting with my camera and an iPhone at the same time)

Now that everyone has a smartphone and video sharing has become so popular, journalists face competition from more than just other news outlets. A high school basketball game this week illustrated this point quite nicely. It used to be that when I covered a game, I would just produce a highlights package and post it to or site when I was done editing, usually 2-3 hours after the game. I started experimenting with posting a shorter clip immediately after the game, and found that these short clips often receive more views than the edited package.

While posting the raw clip is much faster, it still takes me a little bit of time. I have to shoot post-game interviews, go back to my car, import the clip from my camera to my laptop, compress and upload. When Wednesday’s game ended with a buzzer beater, I first tweeted a link to a buzzer beater by the same player from exactly one year ago.

Once the video of this year’s buzzer beater was uploaded, I tweeted the link.

I noticed that someone in the crowd had tweeted their own video 20 minutes earlier.

We have a similar number of followers, but his post, by virtue of being first, had twice as many retweets and favorites. At least one other person tweeted out their own video, and there could be others that I didn’t see.

Now Twitter engagements are not our only measure of success. The tweets are really a way to drive traffic to our site and promote the stories and highlights that no one else has. We offer a quality of coverage that people can’t find anywhere else, but it doesn’t hurt to be first.

With that in mind, I went to Friday’s playoff game between Ledyard and Hillhouse prepared to be first. There is no way to get video off my Sony video camera as quickly as a smartphone can publish to the web, so I mounted by iPhone on the cold shoe on the front of the camera. Ledyard had the ball with the game tied and time running out, so I started recording on both cameras. A buzzer beater attempt was blocked, and the game went to overtime, but I got the video posted via Tout and tweeted it before the new period started.
At the end of the overtime period, Ledyard was trailing by one and had a chance to win it at the buzzer. The shot missed, but I used the same workflow as above to get the video on Tout and Twitter right away.

Had he made the shot, I’m sure the video would have been shared around the local basketball community a lot more than it was, but at least I have a solution for future buzzer beaters.


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